FRINGE: 4.06 And Those We’ve Left Behind — REVIEW

fringe-and-those-weve-left-behind-review

Did “And Those We’ve Left Behind” advance the overarching story in engaging ways, or did it get left behind in its own time bubble? Read on for our take.

THE GOOD

  • It was good to see Peter back in action and, while it could so easily have been contrived, there was actually a very reason to have him join the team on the case.
  • Despite a twee opening, the episode didn’t fall over itself to cram the sap down our throats. Instead, it used the dream to examine Olivia and Peter’s recontextualized relationship in this timeline and, for now, set them apart.
  • The case-of-the-week was one of the better ones in Fringestory. It had a reflective quality and, importantly for the central storyline, the time-loops appear to be directly related to Peter’s return.
  • The episode was nicely put together and well paced. The visuals were also pretty pretty.
  • I’m pleased with the honesty with which the Walter and Peter story is being played out. It makes what they had all the more meaningful.
 THE BAD

  • I find it illogical that Peter has only just discovered he was appearing to Olivia and Walter prior to his return. It would have been one of the first things I’d have been quizzed him about. It’s even worse that Olivia only told him through a casual conversation. Seriously, Liv?
  • I find it hard to believe that Raymond won’t be prosecuted. It made sense for Division to agree with Kate’s request at the time, but surely there’d be a loop-hole of sorts.
  • Would Peter really be allowed to live at ‘home’ after helping on one case? I get it, but it’s still convenient.
  • This episode is unfortunate in that it suffers from the overall lack of Walternate this season. If there’s a good story reason for the Silver Fox’s absence then perhaps it wont feel as strange in retrospect, but at the moment it’s a blemish. I take it Peter has asked for him off-screen?
  • The importance of September not erasing Peter is losing importance. The explanation is probably something simple, like convincing the other Observers that Peter should be allowed to return, but I think this storyline needs to be followed up soon.
THE OVEREVIEW

  • The episode opens with a fake-out, but not one that we couldn’t easily detect as being a dream. There was some debate when the teasers aired as to whose perspective the dream was from. While I liked the idea that it was Olivia, it always made more sense to me that this was Peter‘s dream. There’s more weight to a person telling himself that he’s The Problem.
  • It’s always interesting to examine dreams on Fringe and this was no different, partly due to the sense of displacement — for a while we’re floating around in the construct, trying to figure out what’s going on and who’s really saying what.
  • What’s particularly fun is that the conversation between our dear lovebirds intentionally plays on the line of reality and subconscious, offering more food for thought on the ‘reality’ of Fringe and our mysterious narrator.
  • The dream also works because it’s truthful. Peter’s return is both the ‘perfect day’ and problematic. His repressed observations, his feelings, would later explain his acceptance of the fact that he’s a stranger in a strange land.

  • Olivia doesn’t quite wake Peter up from his note to self, but she certainly stirs him. Like a pot of fresh morning coffee, Olivia will do that to ya.
  • The time loop scenario was well done. We know cycles are a core part of the show’s story and storytelling, and ATWLB is a good example of both being employed in an episode — a mini example of pushing the reset button.
  • It was good to see Astrid out on the field and actually contributing to something. I still find it relatively interesting that this new construct, timeline, whatever it really is, has seen her become Walter‘s ‘eyes’. His perception of the world is still dependant on her.
  • It was neat seeing Astrid using technology from the other side to detect universe degradation, while Walter trashes the manual. It took Brandonate hours to pull that together and Walter has nothing complementary to say?

  • Crumbs, you can tell how much Olivia disapproves of Peter by the jacket she bought him. She’s clearly projecting her emotions here. I can read her like a book. :)
  • Good to see Lincoln more relevant in this episode, although he really doesn’t need to touch his glasses to make himself seem interesting (or perhaps he does?) Come from beyond the frame, Linc, let us see who you really are!
  • Broyles knows they can’t afford to indulge Walter’s unprofessionalism:

“It’s his job to investigate Fringe Events and until something suggests otherwise, HE is a Fringe Event.”

  • I love that Peter is looked at as a Fringe Event. Given what’s happened, he’s probably the King of Fringe Events. He always was.
  • Walter’s examination of Peter was high-larious, with his “subject” this “subject” that, poking him in the tummy like a stay puft, refusing to accept his existence. But it was also quite sad considering Walter isn’t trying to be funny (which, by the way, is when I tend to find him the most high-larious).

  • This is very real for both of them. As I said in my “Novation” review, and as Olivia said to Peter, it must be incredibly difficult for Walter to see the adult version of his son replaced by a stranger, by a concept who represents his biggest temptation. It must also be hard for Peter to return to a world where no-one loves him. But like I after last season’s finale, his actions in the BBM had to be a sacrifice otherwise it just wouldn’t work.
  • I’m thrilled that their need for Peter is not great, because why should it be? Sure, these people have relative holes in their lives, but they’re functioning and the two universes appear to be reconciling. Things aren’t that bad on the other side of the line. Not necessarily better, but not so terrible that Peter can just swoop in and instantly put Gotham right.
  • And I say that with the belief that all of this is on some level a ‘process’, which means that the problems take a while to solve and may actually be a necessary part of the healing process.
  • Peter discovering that Walter lives in the lab was interesting to watch. It shocks him, saddens him, perhaps uplifts him for a moment as he sees a slither of his own ‘importance’, before focusing his mind on The Problem at hand.
  • Credit to Peter for having a bash at ‘helping himself’, it’s pleasing to see him wake up to his calling, putting all that he learned in the Elsewhere to good use. And while his proactivity annoys Walter, it eventually earns his admiration.
  • Peter says something very interesting regarding the damaged space-time continuum: “there may not be any rules to it”. His later time-jump experiences and the open-ended nature of the story suggest we’ll get to explore this is more detail. I think it would be neat if Peter somehow uses his unique position in time to help him get back to Kansas, if indeed that is where the season is heading.

  • It’s not often that a case-of-the-week can be fairly obvious in its direction and yet still be engaging. This Green’s story certainly was that. Owed much to its reflection of the overarching story and the interesting concepts involved. You can also tell that Stephen Root and Romy Rosemont are married, and that helped sell the relationship.
  • What also helped is that we were let inside this intimate journey. It wasn’t rushed, even though the ticking clock factor added that all-important squeeze. I’ve said it before, but Fringe is often at its best when it lets things breathe. The show is so inherently visual that sometimes less is a tool for more.
  • It was good to see Walter rising to the challenge. Unlike last season where for long periods his shunned the stage, crippled by his own selfishness and fear, he’s more proactive as he imparts his wisdom. Sure, it’s predicated on his different emotional landscape in this timeline, but that’s the point. It was also just neat to see the team working together, bouncing off one another like little bouncy things.
  • I’m glad Peter queried the possibility that he and Olivia experienced a shared dream state.
  • Olivia was a bit blunt with him: “you’re a stranger, so what would I feel?” I know she can be ruthless, and perhaps feels somewhat threatened, but it felt a wee bit unwarranted in the way it came out. That said, it’s a building block to the larger point — and one I appreciate.

  • Like “White Tulip”, “Marionette” (and several other episodes) we touch on the ever-poignant theme of bringing a loved one back.

Raymond: “What better thing could I do for you than this?”

  • But this raises the question of who Raymond was bringing Kate back for? The bubble is certainly a fitting metaphor.
  • I’m not sure how Kate had the time to blank out the entire book of equations without Raymond noticing, but I knew she’d sabotage his progress and leave him a message. You can even see her committing to the decision at one point. And that message is a poignant one:

“Raymond, I love you. How you repay me..Just love me and live your life.”

  • The woman has a way with words. Succinctly said. It taps into some of the themes we’ve explored throughout the series, the idea of the true self, and whether we are bound by circumstance or choice.

  • Multiple universes and timelines have allowed us to travel the lines of this question. Last season we spoke long and hard about the soul. Olivia felt cheated that Peter couldn’t recognize the ‘real her’ from his elbow. This season the ruby shoe is somewhat on the other foot, with the team not recognizing Peter.
  • We also have Walter’s continued loathing of his other half — Walternate. All of these strands trace back to the aforementioned themes. Would we still love someone under different circumstances? Do we really choose who we love? Do the answers lie somewhere in the middle?
  • Just as relevant are the external considerations these questions afford, perhaps allowing us to understand ourselves better in order to better understand others.
  • Raymond now has to decide whether he completely loves Kate, or just a time encapsulated version of her. As much as he misses the person she was and the way she made him feel, can he sacrifice all of that to love her as she is, under any circumstance? And can he do that and still ‘live his life’?

  • It’s a difficult question, but the difficult ones..the problems.. are often the most important. Raymond’s impulse to go back and try again and again, speaks to the human condition. It took the strength and courage of his wife to break that cycle.
  • So, for a story so inherently based on what I like to call its cyclical nature, does Peter have to go against impulse and live out this path, loving the memory of those he left behind? Is that the ultimate sacrifice and redemption? Or can he get back to the versions of those he loves, and where that affection is reciprocated?
  • What’s interesting to me is that at the moment is that Peter’s affection for Olivia can be looked at in two intertwined ways. On the one hand we could say that he’s not prepared to love every iteration of Olivia (understandable). On the other hand, there’s a certain redeeming aspect to the fact that he wants to go back to the Olivia he knows, whose qualities and flaws define who he is. It’s not just about Olivia, but she’s a useful tent pole for this examination.
  • This dichotomy works both ways, as I don’t think one holds precedent over the other. I think it’s possible to be both defined by something and have a greater understanding and consideration for the things that appear to be outside of ourselves. For me, these apparent disparate strands come back to the same place, and I think that somehow makes sense.

  • The final shot of Kate is interesting, her faint smile seems to suggest some recognition of events, playing into LOST’s “The Constant“, where a similar ‘mental time-travel’ is employed. I’d like to think that on some level she’s aware of the sacrifice she made. It’s almost a catharsis, except it’s not really resolution, but continuation.
CASE NOTES

“I got too many competing theories, I can’t balance the equation. There’s too many variables and not enough constants.”

  • “I was going to make myself a baloney sandwich, would you care for one, [Olivia]?” It’s a sad day when a traveller from another timeline isn’t offered a baloney sandwich. If this is the shape of things to come I don’t want any part of this timeline. It’s SO selfish!
  • “I’d be happy to join you, as soon as my lab is available to me again. AH! my copy of Carol’s cosmology, I was just looking for that”. Gosh Walter is Petty. I love it! And he takes the bread into his ROOM. OT Walter makes me laugh. :)
  • And yet, a sad Peter makes me feel bad for engaging in the merriment. Him and that bloody jacket, it’s just too much for my heart. “He can’t even look at me”. :(
  • Peter suggests that Olivia and Walter were seeing echoes of the other timeline when they saw visions of him. A reasonable theory that has been kicked around. But Lincoln is not going to get on side if he keeps INTERRUPTING INTERESTING CONVERSATIONS! The glasses thing will only get you so far, Linc. Seriously, unless someone is dead or agent Jessup has returned, you just DON’T barge in like that. Nothing is that important!

  • Very cool scene when the FBI agent was stripped from time. It was a very X-Men moment if you ask me. What makes the above scene sad is that the poor guy cried out for agent Dunham. Listen, he’s not the first or the last grown man who will scream her name.
  • It looked like there were still some civilians in the Tunnel Of Doom. Why didn’t Lincoln evacuate completely? Oh yes, I forgot, he has NO IDEA what he’s doing. Still, good to see him attempt to stand up to the Tidal Of Devastation, while everyone else legged it.

  • Gosh, Peter’s become so snotty since he came back from ‘saving us all’. He has no problem breaking up our time-displaced lovers’ kiss, yet expects us to champion his journey home to Olivia? None of us complained when you took your FINE time getting into the BBM, Pete.
  • I’d love to say the world doesn’t revolve around him, but..it probably does. Still, I’ll call him out when he deserves it.
  • Peter comes to the conclusion that the timeline didn’t need to be reset, that he did. And his complex should start kicking in annny minute now.
  • The final scene didn’t have the bells and whistles that we’ve become accustomed to in modern Fringe, but it hit the right notes for me. Maybe I’m biased because I’m not chomping at the bit for things to just go back to how there were, but I think the story is being honest. We may well get a happy ending when the BBM lights are turned off, but nothing worth having came easy.
  • Sleep tight Peter, don’t let the fringebugs byte. I know what you’ll be dreaming about tonight. ;)
MYSTERIES
  • What did Peter do in Olivia’s dreams?
  • Peter’s time jumps.
  • Has Peter’s presence in the new timeline changed any other fundamental rules?
  • Are the Observers suddenly cool with Peter living it large in their ‘Peter-locked’ timeline?
  • Will Peter find his way back to the OT?
  • Does the BBM still work for Peter?
ANSWERS

  • Olivia explains that shortly before Peter arrived they were dealing with cause & effect anomalies.
  • This episode takes place three days after Peter returned in Subject 9.
  • Olivia says Peter was showing up in her dreams almost every night.
  • Olivia and Peter didn’t share the same dream.
  • Peter was not aware that he appeared to Walter and Olivia before his arrival.
  • Kate’s theory worked because Peter’s arrival to the timeline changed the rules.
  • Walter still owns the Bishop crib.
FINAL THOUGHT

A quality episode that resonated and entertained, while providing a clearer view of this season’s journey.

Best Moment: Raymond reading Kate’s message and Kate’s faint smile.

Best Performance: Joshua Jackson.

Best Line: “How you repay me..Just love me and live your life.”

Takeaways: Peter needs a peacoat. Continuation.

Rating: 9/10 Seriable Stars

Comments

  1. Fringeee says

    Great Review, Roco!
    I also found this episode’s storyline one of the most intriguing in Fringe history.
    I have one complaint: (you’ve already mentioned a big part it)
    Lincoln’s evacuation scene; what was he doing? especially when he decided to take a video, guess he was so impressed by the pretty time bubble. But come one, are they advertising sprint again? (That awkward scene in Marionette is still hunting my dreams, lol)

    “Sleep tight Peter, don’t let the fringebugs byte. I know what you’ll be dreaming about tonight.. ”
    LMAO!

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    • says

      “Lincoln’s evacuation scene; what was he doing? especially when he decided to take a video, guess he was so impressed by the pretty time bubble.”

      Ha! Tell me about it. I knew Lincoln was ‘wet behind the ears’, as they say, but he really took it to the extreme.

      “But come one, are they advertising sprint again? (That awkward scene in Marionette is still hunting my dreams, lol)”

      The product placement is a bit much, but I guess it helps keeps the wolves from the doors.

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      • jacksonheights says

        How come Sprint can stream live video in an underground tunnel when all my calls are dropped going through tunnels. It is an idealistic view of the future indeed!

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      • Scully8 says

        I definitely appreciate Sprint as a means to keep our show on the air, but come on . . . does it have to make one of the characters look like an incompetent! :-)

        Also, Lincoln is not wet behind the ears (maybe in all things Fringe), but he’s been an agent for 5 years.

        Also, on another note: Roco, do you think it’s possible that the Observers weren’t talking about ourFringe team when they said ” . . . know that Peter grew to be a man”? I’ve been thinking they may be talking about some other entity (person or group) that if they knew, it would put the current Fringe team (and the Universe) in danger. Just wondering . . .

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  2. Pwnsauce says

    I’m surprised you didn’t make the comparison to TMFTOS agent getting destroyed on the bridge with the agent getting erased. I think they’re both decently funny. Also the time loop theory working was similar to the floating theory in ‘Os’ in that something that Walter/Peter did made it work though it by all means shouldn’t have.

    Good review as always, but a 9/10 seems high. I would give it maybe a 7.5. This episode just..didn’t do it for me. I liked that the time loops working related to Peter, but I just don’t buy that as a good story arc. It was sort of a mythalone, but in the end it seemed to lean more towards a standalone. Obviously it was miles better than any standalone from seasons 1 or 2, but I feel like my standards have risen greatly from that time. After they started season 3 in such spectacular fashion (I really think that those first 8 episodes were the best arc of the series and most well done), I just am not satisfied with episodes that aren’t mythology heavy. If Peter is a Fringe Event, shouldn’t they spend all their time investigating HIM?

    I guess it’s just hard for me to find any themes from this episode that they haven’t already gone over, and that’s a major problem for me. I thought that once Peter returned, a clear arc would present itself for the next 4 episodes, but I find myself back in a sort of limbo, not knowing what exactly to expect in terms of overarching story. I just don’t see how the case from ATWLB will have any specific connection to episode 8 and the shapeshifters and ‘the return’ (just in case someone who reads this has the willpower not to spoil themselves).

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    • says

      “I’m surprised you didn’t make the comparison to TMFTOS agent getting destroyed on the bridge with the agent getting erased. I think they’re both decently funny. Also the time loop theory working was similar to the floating theory in ‘Os’ in that something that Walter/Peter did made it work though it by all means shouldn’t have.”

      I try to save most of the visual/comparative stuff for the Observations, but I agree with you on those similarities, good connections.

      “Good review as always, but a 9/10 seems high. I would give it maybe a 7.5. This episode just..didn’t do it for me. I liked that the time loops working related to Peter, but I just don’t buy that as a good story arc. It was sort of a mythalone, but in the end it seemed to lean more towards a standalone. Obviously it was miles better than any standalone from seasons 1 or 2, but I feel like my standards have risen greatly from that time. After they started season 3 in such spectacular fashion (I really think that those first 8 episodes were the best arc of the series and most well done), I just am not satisfied with episodes that aren’t mythology heavy. If Peter is a Fringe Event, shouldn’t they spend all their time investigating HIM?”

      Fair points. Ratings can be tricky when comparing to past seasons, but I agree that the expectaions have risen. My ratings reflect that, but they also reflect my impressions of what the episode does in relation to the broader concepts. I think this episode could have been stronger for the reasons that you and others have mentioned, but I also think that what they’re doing right now is pretty high-concept and is best viewed as part of a bigger process. Three episodes like this wouldn’t work and my ratings would soon go down if we got that, but I think the episode as it is stands holds up well with the season so far. I was tempted to go 8.5 (which would have brought “Novation” down a peg), but for me 9 is about right as it probably did more than any other episode this season to click things into place on a certain level. That said, I can only speak for myself here and I can appreciate why you might not quite be feeling it at this stage.

      Hopefully they will use this as a springboard to tell more tightly woven serialized episodes as that’s what they do best, and I think now would be the time to just go for it.

      As for how this episode will connect with the bigger picture, I’d like to think that Peter’s ability to slip through time (or his connection to these ‘altered states’) has been left unresolved for a reason. I think the shapeshifter thread could directly impact that, or it might simply provide additional conflict. Personally, I don’t mind having two or three big threads in play as long as they each have a purpose. But I would say that momentum needs to be maintained. Will Episode 4.07 do that? Blimey, I hope so!

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  3. says

    “The importance of September not erasing Peter is losing importance. The explanation is probably something simple, like convincing the other Observers that Peter should be allowed to return, but I think this storyline needs to be followed up soon.”

    Boy do I agree with that! I haven’t even finished reading your review Roco as I had to stop there and comment. The Observers role in all of this should be paramount and yet we have been given less than cookie crumbs for our viewing efforts. I don’t what is worse the lack of Walternate or the dearth of Observer involvement.

    A lot of people have commented on how much this episode was like something from “Lost” and indeed there was a lot of Easter Eggs that could be associated with Lost. I see this as a bad thing. Lost starting copying itself after a few seasons and it first it was seen as clever. I just thought it was lazy. I hope Fringe doesn’t fall into the same trap. We’re already hunting down the “Pattern” much like season one.

    Enough for now, I’m going to return to reading your review Roco it looks like a tremendous effort.

    Like: Thumb up 4

    • says

      I am completely baffled at the lack of Observers thus far. It’s not like Peter’s full corporeal return is a secret. I’d love a scene at a restaurant, with a table full of Observers led by December, giving September the “once over” for failing to permanently keep Peter from manifesting. Especially seeing that his return has caused “the rules” to change (again).

      The CotW is great and all, but there is much too much filler. Fringe is a serialized show that rather spend it’s time giving “nods” and “winks” to it’s o wn mythology than fully embracing it every single week. This was one of the few episodes that i managed to watch live (usually DVR), but felt like I could have entirely missed and would not have been left wanting.

      As for the rest of our Fringies, like Olivia and Walter, I feel like something is missing too. How much debriefing actually occurred if Peter is just finding out about showing up in the lab, and popping into Olivia’s dreams??? It’s not a massive plot hole, but a miss nonetheless. Walter and Olivia’s “Projection Peters” are now relevant evidence to a much bigger investigation. Moving forward without a full understanding of the “whowhatwhenwhereandhow’s” of Peter’s existence seems very careless. Colonel Broyles, you’ve got some ‘splainin

      Like: Thumb up 2

      • says

        “The CotW is great and all, but there is much too much filler. Fringe is a serialized show that rather spend it’s time giving “nods” and “winks” to it’s o wn mythology than fully embracing it every single week.”

        I’d love Fringe to fully embrace it’s seriability, I think it would be even more rewarding. While it’s certainly a juggling act, the arguments against doing so aren’t compelling enough for me.

        While LOST proved you can have filler in serial, that was more a choice than a given. So yes, less stand alone elements (the Fringe equivalent of ‘filler’) and Fringe could become the perfect serial. Spoons at the ready?

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    • says

      Deffo. The Observers have some ‘splainin to do! September’s decision was HUGE. Has it been rendered meaningless?


      There were a lot of LOST easter eggs and similarities to certain episodes/concepts, and the two shows share a certain vibe, but the episode itself seemed pretty ‘Fringe’ to me.

      I thought Peter’s “PATTERN” drop was a touch heavy by half, but I don’t think the show has become lazy. I think repetition, to a certain extent, is in the Fringe genes.

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  4. grace says

    Great review as always.

    “The show is so inherently visual that sometimes less is a tool for more”.
    I agree!

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  5. Page 48 says

    “Would Peter really be allowed to live at ‘home’ after helping on one case? I get it, but it’s still convenient.”

    But there will be an FBI agent posted just outside so we know Peter’s not going anywhere….unless it’s the same agent that was keeping an eye on Bridget Kelly.

    Raymond’s timey-wimey clock maxed out at “47″ minutes.

    Without Kate, who’s going to remind Raymond to take his cholesterol busters? Is that Peter’s job now?

    Like you, Roco, I find it insane that Olivia is just getting around to having the “Peter, you were in my dreams” conversation. Liv, there’s an “I” in FBI. It’s
    the Federal Bureau of INVESTIGATION. Focus, please.

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    • says

      “Like you, Roco, I find it insane that Olivia is just getting around to having the “Peter, you were in my dreams” conversation. Liv, there’s an “I” in FBI. It’s the Federal Bureau of INVESTIGATION. Focus, please.”

      Exactly. Sort it out, Livvy!

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  6. Aria Mohtadi says

    Wow!
    I loved this episode so much that I’d expected I would,
    And now I realize I need more time to Re-Read this Review again ! :D
    Great job, Roco.

    I’m still laughing at the still with the “Bra and panties” reference! xD xD xD

    I agree, first thing that come to my mind, was Desmond’s time displacements in The Constant. :)
    Ah memories.

    But as much Abrams liked to peek through time travel subjects in his previous
    series, Lost and Alias (remember the flashforward openings in Alias? 72 hours earlier! :D), I think time travel works BEST on Fringe, as proved previously by White Tulip and now this amazing episode which is the best of season 4 so far.

    I’m so excited I can’t fully express my opinions,
    gonna rewatch the episode and re-view your review (I’m starting to sound like Brian from Family Guy!) and then come back here.

    I really hope we get more of these stuff from Fringe, which is
    why I personally love this show.

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    • says

      “I agree, first thing that come to my mind, was Desmond’s time displacements in The Constant. :)
      Ah memories.”

      Memories, indeed! I found that “The Constant” lost some of its sheen after the first-viewing, but it was an interesting and well crafted episode.

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      • Aria Mohtadi says

        @Roco:

        Finally!
        I’m relieved to have read your amazing review at last. :)

        I think Fringe has a certain “sad” quality to itself which usually remains veiled under its “fun/exciting” moments. This episode made me feel (terribly) sad for Peter, and I think as you mentioned, somehow we could make sense of his sacrifice which involves him enduring his “anonymity” in the yellow timeline, instead of being ‘wiped out’ from it.

        I wonder, will this trigger the ultimate ‘course correction’, that September seems to be after?

        About Lincoln, as we discussed earlier,
        like you mentioned, he’s got “less to offer” behind his specs, and I find it ‘annoying’ to watch him as he tends to be the “moralistic axis” of the scene. :\

        But overall, this was a great episode, so far the best of season 4 imo.

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  7. says

    I’m sure someone has better memory than me here, has Fauxlivia and Walternate (versions 2.0) interacted with Peter this season? and/or have they had visions of Peter? or has Olivia, Broyles or Nina (versions 2.0) told anybody on “the other side of the bridge” about Peter appearing in visions and/or in the flesh

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    • FinChase says

      No, he hasn’t interacted with them yet. Don’t know about the dreams/visions yet. I saw an interview with Anna Torv a few weeks ago when then they were filming about episode 8, and she was wearing the Fauxlivia wig, so maybe it’s coming.

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      • Greg Tramel says

        Thanks for the info! that’s what i thought, and add that to the fact that the guy’s time travel machine didn’t start working until Peter became flesh in the primary timeline we saw in this episode and we may be on to something

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  8. MISSNETT says

    Oh Roco I think I look forward to your reviews almost as much as the episodes themselves. You certainly make me laugh and think!
    But please reassure me! As much as I like this exploration of Peter’s relationships with this Walter and Olivia, I sure hope he makes it back to our Walter and Olivia eventually. I want that happy ending they all deserve!
    As I have said before, I love this journey. But it sure can be excruciating!

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    • says

      MISSNETT, I think he will go ‘back’ eventually (whatever back is for Peter); the story seems sentimentally inclined. But I think (I HOPE) he has to work damn hard for it. I also hope that this new timeline isn’t rendered meaningless.

      It can be done, but it will need creativity, poise and a lotta patience from all sides, methinks.

      ..and time. Let’s not forget time!

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  9. Mochi says

    Favorite part of the review — Case Notes “I’d love to say the world doesn’t revolve around him, but..it probably does. Still, I’ll call him out when he deserves it.”

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  10. Stella says

    One of your “ANSWERS” reminded me of Os:

    “Kate’s theory worked because Peter’s arrival to the timeline changed the rules.”

    Didn’t Walter say that the only reason the combination of two of the densest metals in the world resulting in the creation of the super light alloy was because his crossing over changed the rules?

    Like: Thumb up 0

  11. Endor says

    Some peolple on Tumblr noticed that the dream sequence is “flipped” like in a mirror: Jackson’s scar is on his left cheek instead of the right one, so the ring that we saw on his right hand in reality was on his left, as in they were already married.
    Did they change idea after filming the scene and flipped the image to make thing less defined between the characters or was it a deliberate choice? Did they want us to notice that Peter is looking at a mirror version of his life?

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  12. Mel Duff says

    “Peter discovering that Walter lives in the lab was interesting to watch. It shocks him, saddens him, perhaps uplifts him for a moment as he sees a slither of his own ‘importance’, before focusing his mind on The Problem at hand.”…

    To me, “slither” has a negative, serpent-like connotation here. May I get all English-teacher on you and suggest the term “sliver”? You are very detail-oriented, and please take this as a compliment to your high standards of discourse.

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  13. hsa says

    As always Roco, thank you for your thougthful review of this fine episode. I enjoy your reviews especially for their humor and detail. I was gratified by your references to the Wizard of Oz and free will vs. determinism. I had mentioned both of them in my post about the espisode on Fringebloggers, but no one else seemed to notice. I have a question-do you think that Walternate will act in a way towards Peter that is similar to the way the wicked witch treated Dorothy (the poppy field, the monkeys), and do you think Peter’s return to the OT will be as easy as Dorothy clicking her heels? Could the Wizard of Oz be played by Walter?

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    • says

      “I have a question-do you think that Walternate will act in a way towards Peter that is similar to the way the wicked witch treated Dorothy (the poppy field, the monkeys)..”

      That’s a very interesting thought, hsa. I think it would be particularly neat if Walternate treats Peter with a bit more appreciation than Walter (or the Wicked Witch vs Dotty). I just think that would be an interesting development, possibly allowing the pair the long-awaited reconciliation that’s been on hold since “Over There”.

      That being said, I can also see it going the other way. Hard to say until we see the Silver Fox in action, but fun to speculate. Your thoughts on the matter?

      “..and do you think Peter’s return to the OT will be as easy as Dorothy clicking her heels? Could the Wizard of Oz be played by Walter?”

      I’d like to think returning would be hard, although the journey itself might provide the difficulty, and the actual ‘clicking’ back into place (if it has to be that way) might indeed be as easy as pie once he’s done what he needs to do. So maybe a bit of both?

      I think both Walters have been behind the curtain at one point or another, so I think it could apply to both of our wizards!

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      • hsa says

        Thank you for responding Roco. I did not think of OZ until Peter realized he needed to find a way home. I do not want to take the comparison too far, but there is plenty of Oz material to mine. I agree that the yellow brick road home will be difficult and that the actual passage will be easy. Some critics see the yellow brick road as a spiritual journey. Maybe Secember will tell Peter how to get home, and, just maybe, Peter’s return will not be to the world 0f 2025 and also not to two worlds on the brink of war. The writers have a lot of work to do, but have so many possibilitiesl. If the Silver Fox is the corollary to the wicked witch, will he melt into a puddle? The fox could certainly put Peter thourgh his paces while Peter travels the road. Because we have not yet seen the Silver Fox in this timeline, the possibilities are endless. Of course, the Fox will first have to remember Peter. Peter and the fox could have a reconciliation, but I like the fox being the heavy. After all Peter in toe OT barely knows the fos, and what he knows is not good.

        Can you imagine an epsidoe like Brown Betty but using OZ to bring the story along so that in the following episode, Peter can come back home! My imagination is running amuck.

        For me, every week is like peeling another layer of skin off the onion, and after the show is over, I just keep peeling. I am becoming less reluctant to psot, but I still remain a 65 year old femaile lawyer who left a PhD program in philosphy to go to law school . There has never been a TV show that allows me to philosphize the way Fringe does. .

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        • Mel Duff says

          “I had mentioned both of them in my post about the espisode on Fringebloggers, but no one else seemed to notice.”

          I noticed, and recall your original post about this, but the Wizard of Oz is such a tired and played-out cliche’ that it disappoints me that they might be going down that road so overtly. This show has the most original themes on television; I implore them not to jump on the “Wicked” wagon (incidentally, the most boring stage show I’ve ever seen, and yes, I greatly enjoyed the books….another post, another topic? Apologies…)

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  14. edgesight says

    I think that the Peter in the beginning of the season, in this dream and the Peter that woke up after falling from the BBM in “The Last Sam Weiss” episode are all the same…..another Peter from another universe. I also believe that this Peter is in charge of the new shapeshifters. This Peter knew so much about the old shapeshifters, wouldn’t it be likely that the other Peter knew about them too and was able to improve them for his purposes…which are yet to be unveilled.

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    • Fringeee says

      I think it’s because this Peter is actually, Future!Peter. In the day we died, he was given the memories of 15 years of Future Peter’s life, things we are yet to discover.

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      • Mel Duff says

        This is a very interesting theory. If I were Peter, and your theory was correct, I would be extremely tempted to use that knowledge to ascertain whether this Olivia is MY Olivia. Asking about small details known only to the two of them, dropping private jokes or personal references, etc. After thinking about your comment, it has occurred to me that maybe has sworn off this timeline as “not his” a bit prematurely.

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  15. WaySeeker says

    Roco said: ““I was going to make myself a baloney sandwich, would you care for one, [Olivia]?” It’s a sad day when a traveller from another timeline isn’t offered a baloney sandwich. If this is the shape of things to come I don’t want any part of this timeline. It’s SO selfish!”

    I reply: “Shutup and Eat Your Boloney Sandwich”

    hehehe! :-p

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  16. Pierce says

    The importance of September not erasing Peter is losing importance. The explanation is probably something simple, like convincing the other Observers that Peter should be allowed to return, but I think this storyline needs to be followed up soon.

    While I’m always left confused on what I meant to take away from your perspective on Peter (honestly, I don’t know if you simply dislike him on principal, or just don’t like him being with Olivia…or that he’s the source Walter’s selfishness or guilt…I’m at a loss) however, I do agree that the follow-up to that storyline needs to be soon. I don’t believe it’s lost any importance per say, but I would be lying if I said I wasn’t expecting a scene towards the end of the last two episodes where the counsel of Observers to address Septembers deliberate decision not to permanently erase Peter from existence. Maybe it’s been a scheduling issue with Michael Cerveis as to why we haven’t gotten more traction on that portion of the story yet, but I’m going to trust the writers to bring the Observers back into the narrative in a satisfying way.

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  17. jacksonheights says

    Being a big fan of seasons 1 & 2, and not so much of season 3 I LOVED this episode. The more interaction between Peter and OT Walter the better. Turn on any tv show and you get the dynamic between the leading lady and the leading man and the obstacle that keeps them apart. (Note: See Castle, Bones, Gray’s and a host of others). Peters reaction to finding out Walter lives in the lab was priceless. There was a real sense of sadness in Peter in the past two episodes which created a culture where you were left longing for the way things were, but you knew you could not return to the previous era…how much more like real life can you get in a show.
    My favorite part was when OT Walter acknowledged that Peter was smart when he was entering the house in the Faraday cage. I think he even took some sort of pleasure in thinking “this is my son” if just for a moment. I love all the nods and winks to the various aspects Fringe brings to the table, but imo the father/son moments are the best and most realistic which is incredible given this unrealistic world in which this drama is set. Kudos to the writers John Noble and Josh Jackson.

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  18. WalterAppreciationClub says

    Great review & observations as always Roco!

    “I’m not sure how Kate had the time to blank out the entire book of equations without Raymond noticing…”
    Maybe I’ve picked it up wrong, but didn’t she have 4 years to blank out the book? We see her grab the book just as she returns to 2007, so to me that implied she took Raymond’s copy back with her and blanked out the equations in 2007.

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